Forestry

Forestry is the art, science, and practice of studying and managing forests and plantations, and related natural resources. Silviculture, a related science, involves the growing and tending of trees and forests. Modern forestry generally concerns itself with: assisting forests to provide timber as raw material for wood products; wildlife habitat; natural water quality regulation; recreation; landscape and community protection; employment; aesthetically appealing landscapes; and a 'sink' for atmospheric carbon dioxide. A practitioner of forestry is known as a forester. Often found assisting foresters are forest technicians, GIS specialists, and engineers.

Forest ecosystems have come to be seen as one of the most important components of the biosphere, and forestry has emerged as a vital field of science, applied art, and technology. The study of forestry usually consists of many of the following areas:

  • Forest Ecology
  • Soil Science
  • Meteorology and Climatology
  • Forest Entomology and Diseases
  • Wildfire Management
  • Forest Inventory and Timber Scaling
  • Silviculture and Silvics
  • Forest Operations and Harvesting
  • Wood Products
  • Hydrology
  • Wildlife Managment
  • Range and Recreation Management
  • Urban Forestry
  • Road Engineering
  • Law and Communication

This topic page is for organizing the development of Forestry content on Wikiversity.

If you are knowledgeable in any area Forestry, feel free to improve upon what you see, we would greatly appreciate your contributions.

Wollemia nobilisEdit

 
A NPWS firefighter looks up at one of the ancient Wollemi pines discovered in 1994 he has been sent in to protect. Credit: NPWS firefighter.{{fairuse}}

"Desperate efforts by firefighters on the ground and in the air have saved the only known natural grove of the world-famous Wollemi pines from destruction during the record-breaking bushfires in NSW."[1]

"The rescue mission involved water-bombing aircraft and large air tankers dropping fire retardant. Helicopters also winched specialist firefighters into the remote gorge to set up an irrigation system to increase the moisture content of the ground fuels to slow the advance of any fire."[1]

"Wollemi National Park is the only place in the world where these trees are found in the wild and, with less than 200 left, we knew we needed to do everything we could to save them."[2]

"Fossil evidence indicates that the trees existed between 200 and 100 million years ago and were once present across the whole of Australia."[3]

Learning projects and learning resourcesEdit

Learning materials and learning projects can be used by multiple departments. Please cooperate with other departments that use the same learning resource.

Remember, Wikiversity has adopted the "learning by doing" model for education. Lessons should center on learning activities for Wikiversity participants. We learn by doing.

Also, select a descriptive name for each learning project. Learning projects can be listed in alphanumeric order by code. Code numbers are optional, however.

See: Wikiversity learning model.
See: Learning projects
See: Hunter-gatherers project
See: Learning to learn a wiki way
See: Wikiversity:Naming conventions

ResourcesEdit

Department newsEdit

  • May 12, 2007 - Department founded!
  • 1.0 1.1 Peter Hannam (January 15, 2020). "Incredible, secret firefighting mission saves famous 'dinosaur trees'". Sydney, Australia: The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  • Matt Kean (January 15, 2020). "Incredible, secret firefighting mission saves famous 'dinosaur trees'". Sydney, Australia: The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  • Cris Brack (January 15, 2020). "Incredible, secret firefighting mission saves famous 'dinosaur trees'". Sydney, Australia: The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 January 2020.