Social Victorians/100th Performance of the Merchant of Venice at the Lyceum

LogisticsEdit

  • 14 February 1880
  • At the Beefsteak Club
  • A dinner in honor of the 100th performance of Henry Irving's Merchant of Venice at the Lyceum

Related EventsEdit

The Event ItselfEdit

Who Was PresentEdit

Center Table (or Supporters of Mr. Irving)Edit

  1. Mr. Irving, "supported right and left by" (TMoV)
  2. Lord Houghton, who proposed the toast (TMoV, LNT)
  3. Admiral Sir Henry Keppel (TMoV, LNT)
  4. Lord Londesborough (TMoV, LNT)
  5. The Earl of Dunraven (TMoV, LNT)
  6. The Earl of Fife (TMoV, LNT)
  7. The Earl of Onslow (TMoV, LNT)
  8. Sir Frederick Pollock, Bart. (TMoV, LNT)
  9. Sir Coutts Lindsay, Bart. (TMoV, LNT)
  10. Sir W. Gordon-Cumming, Bart. (TMoV, LNT)
  11. Sir Charles Young, Bart. (TMoV, LNT)
  12. Sir Henry Thompson (TMoV, LNT)
  13. Admiral Gordon (TMoV, LNT)
  14. Mr . Philip Currie (TMoV, LNT)
  15. Mr. Tom Taylor (TMoV, LNT)

The Entire List of Those PresentEdit

  1. A. à Beckett (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  2. Davenport Adams (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  3. Hamilton Aidé (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  4. J. Aitken (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  5. James Albery (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  6. J. H. Allen (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  7. D. Anderson (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  8. A. Andrews (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  9. J. G. Anthony (TMoV, alphabetized with the Gs in this article) (see Ganthony, below)
  10. James Archer (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  11. J. K. Aston (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  12. L. F. Austin (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  13. B. Baker (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  14. Serjeant Ballantine (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  15. S. B. Bancroft (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  16. F. Barnard (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  17. J. H. Barnes (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  18. H. K. Barnet (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  19. Right Hon. Justice Barry (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  20. E. Ashmead Bartlett (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  21. W. Ashmead Bartlett (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  22. T. Beale (TMoV)
  23. E. J. Beale (MoVTHN)
  24. A. Beaumont (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  25. R. Becker (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  26. E. Bendall (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  27. Sir Julius Benedict (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  28. J. Bennett (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  29. Captain Ward Bennett (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  30. Peter Berlyn (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  31. C. Bernard (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  32. J. Beveredge (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  33. J. Billington (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  34. E. L. Blanchard (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  35. A. Borthwick (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  36. A. Branscombe (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  37. Jacob Bright, M.P. (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  38. J. Broadfield (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  39. J. Brodie, R.S.A. (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  40. E. Brooke (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  41. R. Shirley Brooks (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  42. Lionel Brough (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  43. F. C. Burnand (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  44. H. J. Byron (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  45. J. Calver (TMoV)
  46. Hay Cameron (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  47. Comyns Carr (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  48. J. Carter (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  49. Claude Carton (MoVTHN)
  50. T. Catling (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  51. Cattermole (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  52. Arthur Cecil (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  53. J. Chambers (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  54. T. Chambers (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  55. Arthur Chappell (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  56. J. B. Chatterton (TMoV) or F. B. Chatterton (MoVTHN)
  57. J. Child (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  58. J. Chute (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  59. Hamilton Clarke (TMoV)
  60. H. Savile Clarke (MoVTHN)
  61. Savile Clarke (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  62. John Clayton (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  63. J. Clifford (MoVTHN)
  64. Professor Sidney Colvin (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  65. W. Compton (TMoV) or C. H. Compton (MoVTHN)
  66. H. B. Conway (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  67. Dutton Cook (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  68. C. Cooper (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  69. F. Cooper (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  70. CosmoLogie (TMoV) or Logie, Cosmo (MoVTHNW)
  71. Sir Coutts Lindsay, Bart. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  72. J. Cowen, M.P. (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  73. Hawes Craven (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  74. Under-Sheriff Crawford (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  75. A. Critchett (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  76. G. Critchett (TMoV) or O. Critchett (MoVTHN)
  77. Dillon Croker (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  78. Cumming, Sir W. G. (MoVTHN) see Gordon-Cumming
  79. Philip Currie (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  80. H. Cuthbert (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  81. W. Cuthbert (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  82. B. Dalton (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  83. A. Darbyshire (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  84. C. Dare (MoVTHN)
  85. J. Davison (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  86. G. Derlacher (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  87. E. Dicey (TMoV) or K. Dicey (MoVTHN)
  88. Charies Dickens (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  89. H. Dickens (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  90. C. Doherty (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  91. T. Dowling (TMoV) or L. W. Dowling (MoVTHN)
  92. Gay Drew (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  93. A. J. Duffield (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  94. The Earl of Dunraven (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  95. E. Elwood (TMoV) or A. Elwood (MoVTHN)
  96. Gilbert Farquhar (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  97. Horace Farquhar (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  98. G. Manville Fenn (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  99. J. Fernandez (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  100. H. Ferrand (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  101. The Earl of Fife (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  102. Luke Fildes, A.R.A. (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  103. F. D. Finlay (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  104. Percy Fitzgerald, D.L. (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  105. Norman Forbes (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  106. Forbes Robertson (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  107. J. Forbes Robertson (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  108. H. Forrester (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  109. C. Fraser (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  110. J. Fullylove (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  111. J. Ganthony (MoVTHN; see J. G. Anthony)
  112. Dundas Gardner (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  113. Herbert Gardner (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  114. Claude Garton (TMoV)
  115. H. Goodban (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  116. Admiral Gordon (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  117. Sir W. Gordon-Cumming, Bart. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  118. R. de T. Gould (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  119. Corney Grain (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  120. Dundas Grant (TMoV, MoVTHN)
  121. W. Grapel (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  122. H. Graves (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  123. G. Grossmith, sen. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  124. G. Grossmith, jun. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  125. Major Hughes Hallett (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  126. W. Hann (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  127. Charles Harcourt (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  128. W. Hardman (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  129. John Hare (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  130. J. Harper (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  131. Fortescue Harrison, M.P. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  132. T. Harrison (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  133. Captain Talbot Harvey (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  134. J. Harwood (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  135. J. Hassard (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  136. Joseph Hatton (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  137. J. Hatton (TMoV) or W. H. Hatton (MoVTHNW)
  138. F. W. Hawkins (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  139. E. W. Hennell (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  140. Gilbert Highton (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  141. Frank Hill (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  142. Rowland Hill (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  143. Sidney Hodges (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  144. John Hollingshead (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  145. George Honey (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  146. Lord Houghton (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  147. J. B. Howard (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  148. H. Howe (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  149. H. Hudson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  150. Thomas Hughes, M.P. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  151. J. Hurst (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  152. Major-General Hutchinson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  153. Wentworth Huysbe (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  154. Henry Irving (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  155. R. Jackson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  156. David James (TMoV)
  157. R. Jeffs (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  158. H. J. Jennings (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  159. L. T. Jennings (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  160. Blanchard Jerrold (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  161. Edmund Johnson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  162. S. Johnson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  163. W. S. Johnson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  164. Charles Kelly (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  165. H. Kemble (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  166. W. H. Kendal (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  167. C. Lamb Kenney (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  168. Admiral Sir Henry Keppel (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  169. W. Beatty Kingston (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  170. C. Kinsman (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  171. L. Knapp (TMoV) or E. L. Knapp (MoVTHNW)
  172. Joseph Knight (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  173. James Knowles (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  174. Henry Labouchere (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  175. Walter Lacy (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  176. Linley Lambourne (TMoV) should be Sambourne?
  177. J. Latham (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  178. Hon. F. Lawley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  179. F. W. Lawson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  180. W. R. Lawson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  181. E. Ledger (TMoV) or H. B. Ledger (MoVTHNW)
  182. Henry Lee (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  183. Richard Lee (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  184. W. A. Leggatt (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  185. Edward Legge (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  186. H. S. Leigh (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  187. Sir Baldwyn Leighton, Bart., M.P. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  188. Jonas Levy (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  189. Arthur Lewis (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  190. George Lewis (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  191. Logie, Cosmo (MoVTHNW) see CosmoLogie, above
  192. Lord Londesborough (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  193. E. Long, A.R.A. (TMoV MoVTHNW)
  194. Morell Longden (TMoV MoVTHNW)
  195. R. Halkett Lord (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  196. H. Louther (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  197. G. B. Loveday (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  198. H. J. Loveday (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  199. E. Y. Lowrie (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  200. F. Mackenzie (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  201. Dr. Morell Mackenzie (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  202. J. Maclean (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  203. Frank Marshall (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  204. Justin M'Carthy, M.P. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  205. J. H. M'Carthy (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  206. J. M'Dermott (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  207. C. Mathews (TMoV)
  208. Arthur Mathison (TMoV)
  209. T. Mead (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  210. T. Meller (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  211. J. M'Henry (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  212. P. Middlemist (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  213. Frank Miles (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  214. Millward, Charles (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  215. A. Mitchell (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  216. J. B. Monckton (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  217. Frankford Moore (TMoV) or Frankfort Moore (MoVTHNW)
  218. J. Mortimer (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  219. C. M'Rae (TMoV) or C. M. Rae (MoVTHNW)
  220. W. M'Turk (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  221. Douglas Murray (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  222. Dr. Nedley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  223. Henry Neville (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  224. T. Northcott (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  225. H. Nicholson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  226. Alderman Nottage (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  227. John O'Connor (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  228. T. O'Dell (TMoV) or E. J. O'Dell (MoVTHNW)
  229. H. Oliver (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  230. The Earl of Onslow (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  231. Captain Onslow (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  232. W. Orchardson, R.A. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  233. J. C. Parkinson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  234. A. Paterson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  235. H. Paul (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  236. H. Payne (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  237. Dr. Peele (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  238. E. Pellew (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  239. J. Pettie, R.A. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  240. E. Pinches (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  241. A. Pinero (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  242. F. Pollock (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  243. Sir Frederick Pollock, Bart. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  244. Walter Pollock (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  245. L. D. Powles (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  246. Val Prinsep, A.R.A. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  247. Baden Pritchard (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  248. T. Purnell (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  249. C. M. Rae (see C. M'Rae, above)
  250. J. Randegger (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  251. R. Reece (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  252. Brinley Richards (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  253. G. Rignold (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  254. A. Roche (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  255. J. Rodgers (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  256. E. Russell (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  257. H. Russell (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  258. Desmond Ryan (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  259. J. Ryder (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  260. E. Saker (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  261. Linley Sambourne (MoVTHNW; misspelled as Lambourne in TMoV)
  262. J. D'A. Samuda (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  263. J. Sapsford (TMoV)
  264. W. Sawyer (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  265. Dr. Max Schlesinger (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  266. Clement Scott (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  267. J. Selwyn (TMoV) or E. M. Selwyn (MoVTHNW)
  268. Sir Bruce Seton, Bart. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  269. Palgrave Simpson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  270. Tollemache Sinclair (TMoV) or C. G. Sinclair (MoVTHNW)
  271. G. W. Smalley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  272. Samuel Smiles, LL.D. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  273. Talbot Smith (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  274. R. Soutar (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  275. W. Spottiswoode (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  276. Herbert Stack (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  277. A. Stirling (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  278. Bram Stoker (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  279. A. Stuart-Wortley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  280. A. Swanborough (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  281. E. Swanborough (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  282. T. Swinbourne (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  283. L. Alma Tadema, R.A. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  284. J. Tapping (TMoV) or A. Tapping (MoVTHNW)
  285. Isaac Tarry (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  286. Tom Taylor (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  287. J. M. Teesdale (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  288. W. Telbin (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  289. John Tenniel (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  290. Lionel Tennyson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  291. Alfred Thompson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  292. Sir Henry Thompson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  293. W. Thompson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  294. Dr. W. Thomson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  295. J. Thorley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  296. T. Thorne (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  297. S. Timmins (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  298. T. Tingay (TMoV) or C. Tingay (MoVTHNW)
  299. W. Tinsley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  300. F. Toole (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  301. J. L. Toole (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  302. Fox Turner (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  303. Godfrey Turner (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  304. F. Tyars (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  305. H. Vaughan (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  306. W. H. Vernon (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  307. Hermann Vezin (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  308. S. Walker (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  309. Charles Warner (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  310. A. E. T. Watson (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  311. Byron Weber (TMoV) or Byron Webber (MoVTHNW)
  312. H. White (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  313. Horace Wigan (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  314. O. Wilde (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  315. W. Wilde (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  316. Hume Williams (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  317. Montagu Williams (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  318. W. G Wills (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  319. Hon. Lewis Wingfield (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  320. Dr. Forbes Winslow (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  321. R. Wyndham (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  322. Edmund Yates (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  323. C. Yardley (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  324. Sir Charles Young, Bart. (TMoV, MoVTHNW)
  325. T. H. Young (TMoV, MoVTHNW)

AnthologyEdit

"The Talk of the Week" was a column in the Illustrated London News.

Announcement Before the EventEdit

<quote>In alluding, however, to the modern fancy for a refined and cultured form of pleasant Bohemianism, it may be interesting to note that on the hundredth night of "The Merchant of Venice" Mr. Henry Irving intends to invite to the old Beefsteak Club-Room attached to the Lyceum Theatre a most brilliant and representative collection of men famous in letters and art. This fine old apartment, long neglected and devoted to the storage of theatrical properties, is being decorated for the occasion; and it is hoped that many of the articles of Beefsteak furniture, scattered at the sale some years ago, may be reunited on this memorable evening. The chairs and the silver gridiron are, of course, in existence.</quote> ("Talk of the Week [1880-01-31]")

The old Beefsteak Club — the Sublime Order of BeefsteaksEdit

A correction to one detail follows in the 7 February issue:

<quote>A courteous and learned correspondent in matters of social interest — Mr. J. Ashby Sterry — points out that the old Beefsteak Club — the Sublime Order of Beefsteaks — never had a silver gridiron, but that the "original grid" was secured at a public auction, through the good offices of Mr. Pond and Mr. Levy Lawson, for the younger institution in King William-street, whose kitchen it now adorns. Doubtless this venerable trophy will be temporarily transferred to its old home at the Lyceum on Valentine's Day, when literature and art are to commemorate the one hundredth night of "The Merchant of Venice" under the hospitable room of Mr. Henry Irving.</quote> ("Talk of the Week [1880-02-07]")

Quote IntroEdit

On the 28th, in "The Talk of the Week,"

<quote>By-the-way, in alluding to the Lyceum Theatre, it may not be out of place to state that since the famous commemorative banquet in honour of the hundredth night of the "Merchant of Venice" Mr. Irving has thoroughly discovered and restored the premises formerly occupied by the Sublime Society of Beefsteaks. The kitchen, the pantry, the vast wine-cellars, the massive doors that closed in the curious conversation, the secret passages, and the ancient panellings are all put back as they used to be in the older times, and, if I mistake not, the old hant is once more on high days and holidays to be dedicated to conversational and convivial purposes, instead of being used as an old lumber-room [lb at hyphen] for theatrical properties. A better or more complete example of restoration has not been seen in London for some time, and it must delight the antiquarian soul of Mr. Arnold, who is one of the few living members of the Old Beefsteak Club, in Exeter-street, who heard Lord Lyndhurst sing the "Warbling Waggoner."</quote> ("Talk of the Week [1880-02-28]")

Quote IntroEdit

<quote>"It has been reserved for an actor," said an enthusiastic comedian at the Lyceum the other evening, "to bring together three hundred representatives of every form and phase of art, and to make an occasion that will be as memorable as it was imposing. No one else could do it, my dear Sir, but a Lord Mayor or a Prince of the Blood Royal!" No doubt the commemorative banquet given by Mr. Henry Irving on the occasion of the hundredth night of "The Merchant of Venice" was a very remarkable occasion, as much for the intellect of the assembly as for the dignity and nobility of the scene. Nothing was spared for the purpose of enriching the banquet; and I could only have wished that the praise of the host had been slightly divested of its cynicism and adorned with a little more sincerity. Clever, no doubt; amusing, unquestionably; and genial throughout was the speech of Lord Houghton; but, considering the occasion that prompted it, and the man to whom it was dedicated, there might, perhaps, have come from the lips of a poet and an artist something in the way of congratulation that Shakespeare lived amongst us once more, and that the force of scholarship, earnestness, and intelligence had broken through the mist that obscured the poetical drama from the vision of the playgoer.</quote> (Talk of the Week. Illustrated London News (London, England), Saturday, February 21, 1880; pg. 178; Issue 2125, Col. B)

Quote IntroEdit

<quote>"THE MERCHANT OF VENICE."

Those bidden to Mr. Irving's supper, which was held on Saturday night at the Lyceum in commemoration of the 100th performance of "The Merchant of Venice," were much astonished at the transformation effected during the time of their passing from the front of the theatre to the back. When, a little more than half an hour after the green curtain had fallen, a body of some 350 guests filed down from the old Beefsteak Club-room, which was used as the reception-room, the whole scene was changed. There was not remaining a single trace of Belmont, with its splendour of misty moonlight, no indication of Venetian streets, or colonnades, or the court of justice. The whole stage, from wall to wall and from footlights to scene dock, was a huge pavilion of crimson and white, lit by two gigantic chandeliers containing hundreds of lights, and by the myriad of wax candles which studded the long tables from end to end. Through the filmy canvas the lamps of the theatre, still left lighted, showed dimly, giving unconsciously an effect of immense distance and huge proportions. The occasion was a remarkable one. For the first time since it was written the play had reached a run of one hundred consecutive performances, and certainly the gathering to celebrate the event was a remarkable one also. Politics, arms, law, medicine, literature, science, art, and commerce were represented, and a glance at the list of the names of the guests given below who were present will show how worthily. At the centre of the top table sat Mr. Irving, supported right and left by Lord Houghton and Admiral Sir Henry Keppel, Lord Londesborough, the Earls of Dunraven Fife, and Onslow, Sir Frederick Pollock, Sir Coutts Lindsay, Sir W. Gordon-Cumming, Sir Charles Young, Sir Henry Thompson, Admiral Gordon, Mr . Philip Currie, and Mr. Tom Taylor. Around were grouped a great body of over 300 men, the names of nearly all of whom are familiar to every one. The evening was one of triumph, and showed the extraordinary position which Mr. Irving has won for himself, and justly won, by high and honourable ambition, exceptional ability, and unceasing work. After the loyal toasts, which were drunk standing to the National Anthem, choired by boys' voices, Lord Houghton proposed the one toast of the evening, to which Mr. Irving of course responded. Lord Houghton is a clever and witty speaker, and on the present occasion excelled in epigram, happy in a cynical sense, but perhaps not altogether judicious. In marked contrast was Mr. Irving's reply, no less ready, no less humorous, but touched with flashes of sympathetic confidence, and pervaded by the deep earnestness of purpose which marks the man of belief in and harmony with an age of progress. On his first rising to reply Mr. Irving was received with an enthusiastic cheer, and on the conclusion of his speech, which made a bright half hour, all the enthusiasm with which his friends and the public are wont to receive him broke out afresh, and cheer after cheer rang through the great expanse. After the speeches the company adjourned for the purpose of smoking to the old Beefsteak Club-room, which looked most picturesque with its oaken wainscot, grained ceiling, and Tudor arches, and adorned by many pictures, the chief attraction of which was Mr. Long's picture of Mr. Irving as Richard III. A conspicuous object in the room was the gridiron of the old Beefsteak Club, which was thrice rescued from blazing theatres. With such a gathering of artists there was of course much interesting amusement, and a late hour saw a large assembly still in the room. The following is the list of the chief guests who were present:— Hamilton Aidé, James Albery, J. K. Aston, L. F. Austin, J. Aitken, Davenport Adams, James Archer, A. Andrews, J. H. Allen, D. Anderson, Serjeant Ballantine, S. B. Bancroft, F. C. Burnand, Right Hon. Justice Barry, J. Brodie, R.S.A., W. Ashmead Bartlett, E. L. Blanchard, J. Billington, Lionel Brough, E. Bendall, Sir Julius Benedict, R. Becker, A. à Beckett, T. Beale, Peter Berlyn, H. J. Byron, F. Barnard, R. Shirley Brooks, J. Bennett, B. Baker, J. Beveredge, A. Beaumont, E. Ashmead Bartlett, A. Branscombe, Jacob Bright, M.P., J. Broadfield, H. K. Barnet, J. H. Barnes, E. Brooke, A. Borthwick, C. Bernard, Captain Ward Bennett, Sir W. Gordon Cumming, Bart., Savile Clarke, Comyns Carr, A. Critchett, G. Critchett, Claude Garton, Dutton Cook, H. B. Conway, T. Catling, Arthur Cecil, Professor Sidney Colvin, Under-Sheriff Crawford, — Cattermole, W. Cuthbert, H. Cuthbert, Hawes Craven, Hay Cameron, T. Chambers, J. Chambers, J. Child, J. B. Chatterton, Dillon Croker, Philip Currie, C. Cooper, F. Cooper, Arthur Chappell, J. Chute, J. Carter, J. Calvert, J. Cowen, M.P., Hamilton Clarke, W. Compton, John Clayton, the Earl of Dunraven, T. Dowling, E. Dicey, Duffield, J. Davison, A. Darbyshire, Charies Dickens, H. Dickens, C. Doberty, G. Derlacher, B. Dalton, E. Elwood, the Earl of Fife, G. Manville Fenn, J. Forbes Robertson, Forbes Robertson, J. Fernandez, Percy Fitzgerald, D.L , Luke Fildes, A.R.A., C. Fraser, Gilbert Farquhar, Horace Farquhar, F. D. Finlay, J. Fullylove, Forrester, H. Ferrand. Norman Forbes, Admiral Gordon, W. Grapel, Corney Grain, G. Grossmith, sen., G. Grossmith, jun., Dundas Gardner, H. Goodban, Dundas Grant, J. G. Anthony, Herbert Gardner, Gay Drew, H. Graves, R. de T. Gould, Lord Houghton, Major-General Hutchinson, W. Hardman, J. Hassard, W. Hann, Major Hughes Hallett, John Hare, Frank Hill, Wentworth Huysbe, J. B. Howard, F. W. Hawkins, John Hollingshead, Joseph Hatton, E. W. Hennell, Captain Talbot Harvey, Rowland Hill, J. Hatton, M. Howe, J. Hurst, Thomas Hughes, M.P., George Honey, J. Harwood, Sidney Hodges, H. Hudson, T. Harrison, Charies Harcourt, J. Harper, Gilbert Highton, Fortescue Harrison, M.P., David James, L. T. Jennings, W. S. Johnson, R. Jackson, H. J. Jennings, Blanchard Jerrold, S. Johnson, Edmund Johnson, R. Jeffs, Admiral Sir Henry Keppel, Joseph Knight, L. Knapp, W. Beatty Kingston, W. H. Kendal, James Knowles, H. Kemble, Charles Kelly, C. Lamb Kenney, C. Kinsman, Lord Londesborough, Sir Baldwyn Leighton, Bart., M.P., Sir Coutts Lindsay, Bart., F. W. Lawson, Jonas Levy, R. Halkett Lord, E. Long, A.R.A., Edward Legge, E. Ledger, E. Y. Lowrie, George Lewis, Walter Lacy, Henry Labouchere, H. J. Loveday, G. B. Loveday, CosmoLogie, W. R. Lawson, H. Louther, Arthur Lewis, J. Latham, Hon. F. Lawley, W. A. Leggatt, H. S. Leigh, Morell Longden, Henry Lee, Richard Lee, J. B. Monckton, Dr. Morell Mackenzie, Frank Marshall, T. Meller, Frank Miles, J. M'Henry, C. Mathews, Justin M'Carthy, M.P., J. H. M'Carthy, Millward, Arthur Mathison, J. Maclean, Frankford Moore, J. M'Dermott, T. Mead, W. M'Turk, Douglas Murray, P. Middlemist, J. Mortimer, F. Mackenzie, A. Mitchell, Alderman Nottage, Henry Neville, T. Northcott, Dr. Nedley, H. Nicholson, the Earl of Onslow, John O'Connor, T. O'Dell, W. Orchardson, R.A., H. Oliver, Captain Onslow, Sir Frederick Pollock, Bart., Walter Pollock, F. Pollock, E. Pinches, J. C. Parkinson, T. Purnell, L. D. Powles, E. Pellew, Baden Pritchard, Dr. Peele, A. Pinero, H. Payne, Val Prinsep, A.R.A., A. Paterson, J. Pettie, R.A., H. Paul, J. Rodgers, J. Ryder, R. Reece, C. M'Rae, E. Russell, H. Russell, A. Roche, J. Randegger, G. Rignold, Desmond Ryan, Brinley Richards, Sir Bruce Seton, Bart.; Dr. Max Schlesinger, Clement Scott, Palgrave Simpson, T. Swinbourne, Bram Stoker, G. W. Smalley, E. Saker, J. Selwyn, E. Swanborough, A. Swanborough, R. Soutar, Talbot Smith, W. Spottiswoode, Linley Lambourne, J. Sapsford, J. D'A. Samuda, Tollemache Sinclair, Herbert Stack, W. Sawyer, Samuel Smiles, LL.D.; A. Stirling, J. L. Toole, W. Thompson, W. Tinsley, Tom Taylor, W. Telbin, Alfred Thompson, J. Thorley, L. Alma Tadema, R.A., John Tenniel, T. Thorne, Dr. W. Thomson, Isaac Tarry, S. Timmins, F. Tyars, J. Tapping, T. Tingay, J. M. Teesdale, Lionel Tennyson, Godfrey Turner, Fox Turner, Sir Henry Thompson, F. Toole, Hermann Vezin, Vaughan, W. H. Vernon, Hon. Lewis Wingfield, W. G Wills, A. Stuart-Wortley, Horace Wigan, S. Walker, O. Wilde, W. Wilde, Hume Williams, A. E. T. Watson, Charles Warner, R. Wyndham, H. White, Dr. Forbes Winslow, Montagu Williams, Byron Weber, Sir Charles Young, Bart., Edmund Yates, T. H. Young, C. Yardley. Among these who were most conspicuous in the vicinity of the cl t.i tr.it: were - Lord Houghton, Lord Dunraven, Lord Londesborough, the Hon. Lewis Wingfield, Sir Frederick Pollock, Sir Coutts Lindsay, Sir B. Seton, Mr. Tom Taylor, Mr. Alma Tadema, R.A., Mr. __a , ?? [the end of one line and most of the rest is missing here] Serjeant Ballantine, Mr. Edmund Yates, Mr. Dutton Cook, Mr. Thomas Hughes, Mr. John Hollingshead, Mr. Blanchard Jerrold. After the banquet, which was completely successful, had been removed, Mr. IRVING proposed "The Queen and the Royal Family," which was drunk upstanding. Lord HOUGHTON said that this was a convivial and private meeting, but he was commanded to give them a toast - "The health of Mr. Henry Irving - (loud cheers ) - and the Lyceum Theatre." The occasion on which they met was a centenary of the performance of the "Merchant of Venice." He did not like centenaries, but Corneville" had been ringing on he did not know how therefore our men should have more. "The Bells of Corneville" had been ringing on he did not know how many nights, and the "Belis of Alsace" nearly as many. For his part, looking back to the days of his youth, he preferred the arrangement by which the same pieces came on never more than twice a week, when one could see various actors in various róles with various and additional interest; and he was not sure that health, and he was quite sure it could not be any great great personal exertions almost to the injury of their cepted as they were, and it was under that state of things benefit to art. (Hear, hear.) But things must be accepted as they were, and it was under that state of things that Mr. Irving had accepted the management of that theatre, and he had done so under very favourable auspices, for dramatic art was popular with all classes. theatre, and he had done so under very favourable very much from the impurity, and it might be the scandal He had come also at a time when the stage was purified ing and high conduct was not confined to special families, attaching to it before, so that the tradition of good breed- or Mr. Irving himself, but had spread over the larger part of the whole profession, so that families of condition were ready to allow their sons, after a university education, to enter the dramatic profession. There had condition were ready to allow their sons, after a university education, to enter the dramatic profession. There had been a school of historians who had taken upon them- selves to rehabilitate all the great villains of the world. These historians made Nero and Tiberius only a little inordinate love cf art. They made Richard III. a most amiable Sovereign, particularly fond of nephews — inordinate love of art. They made Richard III. a most amiable Sovereign, particularly fond of nephews — (laughter) — while French historians showed that Marat blood. (Laughter.) While upon that stage tbey had the human race by their dislike to shedding human for the old Jew, Shylock, who was regarded usually as a seen a rehabilitation something of the same nature, for the old Jew, Shylock, who was regarded usually as a ferocious monster, whose sole desire was to avenge himself in the most brutal manner on the Christians of his neigh- bourhood, had become a gentleman of the Hebrew persuasion — (laughter) — with the manners of a Rothschild, and and a wilful, pernicious daughter; and the process went period — (laughter) — afflicted with a stupid, foolish servant and a wilful, pernicious daughter; and the process went on till the Hebrew gentleman, led by a strange chance into the fault of wishing to vindicate in his own person the injuries of centuries of wrong to his ancestors, is foiled by a very charming woman — (cheers) — but he nevertheless retired as the avenger of the wrongs of centuries heaped upon his race accompanied by the tears of women and the admiration of men. (Laughter, and hear, but as a very honest man, only devoted to the object of sonate Iago he would be regarded, not as a violent, chose to resume the character of Alfred Jingle he would, preserving the honour of his wife — (laughter) — or if he chose to resume the character of Alfred Jingle he would, instead of a disreputable character, go down to posterity as nothing more than an amiable young man who wished to wliich Mr. Irving would never pervert or misrepresent, married life. (Laughter.) But there was one character show in the management of his theatre the dramatic and that was his own. (Cheers.) He would always show in the management of his theatre the dramatic spirit which his country demanded. He would always be the true artist, loving art for its own sake — hear, hear) — following in the personalities which he own great imagination. (Cheer..) They would see hi nia but carrying out as best he could the high forms of his own great imagination. (Cheers.) They would see him in his relations with others, as in the management of the theatre — and that was a very large relation — they would forms of art, and especially in the one Mr. Irving 033u- nisant of the merits of others — a very difficult thing in all forms of art, and especially in the one Mr. Irving occupied. He believed that under these circumstances Mr. Irving would achieve a great name, and that when the children's children of those at that gathering were reading the dramatic annals of the present time, and found how highly tbe name of Mr. Irving had been mentioned under all conditions of dramatic life, thoy would be proud to find from their family traditions that their progenitors had been there that night. (Loud cheers.) The noble lord concluded by proposing "The health of Mr. Irving," which was drunk with enthusiasm, the guests rising to ovation, returned thanks iv a singularly happy speech, in Mr. IRVING, who on rising to respond received a perfect ovation, returned thanks in a singularly happy speech, in which he gratefully and courteously acknowledged the handsome terms in which Lord Houghton had pro- posed the toast. Diverging then into tho facetious, he had tei ions thoughts of asking their consideration for verse, called "The After Life of Shylock," for which he had serious thoughts of asking their consideration for one night, the last scene of which was the return of Shylock to Belmont with a basket of lemons. (Laughter.) Being pathetically told, he thought something might be made of it, and it was certain that the sympathy of the tribe would go a great way towards insuring success, for they came now from all parts to see Shylock, tbe only people who did not like it being the Germans. (Laughter.) At the close of a speech which kept his audience in a state of hilarity for over half an hour, he did not diminish the effect of his address by announcing that he gave permission to smoke within the pavilion, and by providing very excellent cigars for the purpose. Of the previous performance, at which most of those present at the supper "assisted," it is sufficient to say that Mr. Irving acted in his best form, and received the highest support. The trial scene went with signal success, ts chastened beauty - the use of such words is strictly defensible - enthralling the audience and holding it spell- bonrd. Miss Terry's Portia, too, has ripened since it was first seen and is a bewitching piece of acting. The poetry and beauty of the atmosphere surrounding the play were felt by the spectators, and the entire performance had a charm which may well commend it to a hundred more audiences. Those present at both performances and supper carried away with them a pleasant and, in its way, unique souvenir. The burden of sustaining this was apparently too heavy for not a few of the guests, judging by their reluctance to leave the scene of enjoyment. Not too urgent are in the present month the indices of dawn. These, however, gave disagreeable evidence of the in- coming day long before the latest guest took his departure.</quote> ("Merchant of Venice")

From The Era 22 February 1880:Edit

<quote>"THE MERCHANT OF VENICE." THE HUNDREDTH NIGHT. On the evening of Saturday, the 14th of February, the Festival of St. Valentine, an event without precedent was commemorated in a manner without parallel at the Lyceum. The revival of The Merchant of Venice, one of the most notable features of the present theatrical season, had reached on that day its hundredth consecutive representation, and the Lessee of the Lyceum, to whose great capacity as an actor and to whose intelligent direction as a Manager the sustained run of the Shakespearian play was so largely due, appropriately identified the occurrence with the opportunity of offering all admirers and students of the Drama the means, of commemorating an unexampled triumph of the histrionic art on the very stage where the result had been achieved. Invitations to three hundred gentlemen, closely associated with Literature and the Drama, were sent forth by Mr Henry Irving, and were readily accepted with scarcely an exception. Many availed themselves of the chance of again witnessing a performance of remarkable excellence, and shortly before midnight the whole of the privileged company assembled at the royal entrance to the Lyceum Theatre to testify their interest in the memorable event. Mr Henry Irving, who had appropriately changed his stage costume "while one with moderate haste might tell a hundred," received his guests in the apartment of the building formerly identified with the gatherings of the old "Beefsteak Club," linked with so many memories of the past. The wines and appurtenances of the "Sublime Society of the Beefsteak," established about a century and a quarter ago, were sold, it will he remembered, eleven years since; but the room still retained many of the inscriptions denoting the use to which it had once been appropriated. Towards the midnight hour the visitors assembled in increasing numbers, and, after a pleasant interchange of congratulations, in a throng where everybody knew everybody else, the company found themselves passed through the theatrical armoury into a spacious marquée, ornamented with white and scarlet stripes, which had been created on the stage with something like magical celerity. A more representative assemblage of the lovers and students of the Drama had never been collected than was shown in those gathering round the sumptuously-decorated tables Mr Henry Irving had prepared for their reception, and the banquet, furnished by the celebrated house of Gunter, in Berkeley-square, was of the most costly and elaborate description. From the hot, clear turtle soup, which inaugurated the splendid repast, to thse Parmesan "straws," brought in at the close of the refection, the modestly styled "supper" proved a feast of the most substantial and epicurean kind. The champagne, supplied in magnums, was Heidsieck's dry monopole of the famous 1874 vintage, and the cigars, so were of the finest quality, and were only reasonably assumed to have cost at least one shilling each. An inscription from Macbeth (act three, scene four) "At first and last the hearty welcome," decorated the eastern side of the capacious tent forming the banqueting ball, and expressed in happy phrase the hospitality of Mr Henry Irving, who gave to each guest a hearty greeting, while in the motto attached to each copy of The Merchant of Venice presented to every visitor was conveyed a sentiment fully borne out by the kindly host of the evening, "I count myself in nothing else so happy as in a soul remembering my good friends." The bill of fare was as follows: — "Clear turtle and punch, cold salmon and cucumber, lamb cutlets and mushrooms, sweetbreads, stuffed larks, cold game and salad, ham and peas, Russian salad, aspic of prawns, Parmesan straws, cheese, salad, and celery. Heidsieck 1874, Leoville 1874."

Mr HENRY IRVING presided on the occasion, and the company comprised-- [the following list was printed in 3 columns in the newspaper article and not numbered]

  1. A'Beckett, A.
  2. Adams, Davenport
  3. Aidé, Hamilton
  4. Aitken, J.
  5. Albery, James
  6. Allen, J. H.
  7. Anderson, D.
  8. Andrews, A.
  9. Archer, James
  10. Aston, J. F.
  11. Austin, L. F.
  12. Baker, B.
  13. Ballantine, Serjeant
  14. Bancroft, S. B.
  15. Barnard, F.
  16. Barnes, J. H.
  17. Barnet, H. K.
  18. Barry, Rt Hn Justice
  19. Bartlett, W. A.
  20. Bartlett, E. Ashmead
  21. Beale, E. J.
  22. Beaumont, A.
  23. Becker, R.
  24. Bendall, E.
  25. Benedict, Sir, Julius
  26. Bennett, J.
  27. Berlyn, Peter
  28. Bennett, Capt. Ward
  29. Bernard, C.
  30. Beveredge, J.
  31. Billington, J.
  32. Blanchard, E. L.
  33. Borthwick, A.
  34. Branscombe, A.
  35. Bright, Jacob, M.P.
  36. Broadfield, J.
  37. Brodie, J., R.S.A.
  38. Brooke, E.
  39. Brooks, R. Shirley
  40. Brough, Lionel
  41. Burnand, F. C.
  42. Byron, H. J.
  43. Cameron, Hay
  44. Carr, Comyns
  45. Carter, J.
  46. Carton, Claude
  47. Cattermole, T.
  48. Catling, T.
  49. Cecil, Arthur
  50. Chambers, T.
  51. Chambers, J.
  52. Chappell, Arthur
  53. Chatterton, F. B.
  54. Child, J.
  55. Chute, J.
  56. Clarke, Saville
  57. Clarke, H. Savile
  58. Clarke, Hamilton
  59. Clayton, John
  60. Clifford, J.
  61. Cook, Dutton
  62. Cooper, F.
  63. Cooper, C.
  64. Colvin, Prof. Sidney
  65. Compton, C. H.
  66. Conway, H. B.
  67. Cowen, J., M.P.
  68. Craven, Hawes
  69. Crawford, Un-Sheriff
  70. Critchitt, A.
  71. Critchett, O.
  72. Croker, Dillon
  73. Cumming, Sir W. G.
  74. Currie, Philip
  75. Cuthbert, W.
  76. Cuthbert, H.
  77. Dalton, B.
  78. Darbyshire, A.
  79. Dare, C.
  80. Davison, J.
  81. Derlacher, G.
  82. Dicey, K.
  83. Dickens, Charles
  84. Dickens, H.
  85. Doherty, C.
  86. Dowling, L. W.
  87. Drew, Gay
  88. Duffield, A. J.
  89. Dunraven, Earl of
  90. Elwood, A.
  91. Fenn, G. Manville
  92. Fife, Earl of
  93. Robertson, J. Forbes
  94. Robertson, Forbes
  95. Farquhar, Gilbert
  96. Farquhar, Horace
  97. Fernandez, J.
  98. Ferrand, H.
  99. Fildes, Luke, A.R.A.
  100. Finlay F. D.
  101. Fitzgerald, P , D.L.
  102. Forbes, Norman
  103. Forrester, H.
  104. Fraser, C.
  105. Fullylove, J.
  106. Ganthony, J.
  107. Gardner, Dundas
  108. Gardner, Herbert
  109. Goodban, H.
  110. Gordon, Admiral
  111. Gould, R. de T.
  112. Grain, Corney
  113. Grant, Dundas
  114. Grapel, W.
  115. Graves, H.
  116. Grossmith, G., sen.
  117. Grossmith, G., jun.
  118. Hallett. Major H.
  119. Hann, W.
  120. Harcourt, Charles
  121. Hardman, W.
  122. Hare, John
  123. Harper, J.
  124. Harrison, F., M.P.
  125. Harrison, T.
  126. Harvey, Captain Talbot
  127. Harwood, J.
  128. Hassard, J.
  129. Hatton, Joseph
  130. Hatton, W. H.
  131. Hawkins, F. W.
  132. Hennell, E. W.
  133. Highton, Gilbert
  134. Hill, Frank
  135. Hill, Rowland
  136. Hodges, Sidney
  137. Hollingshead, John
  138. Honey, George
  139. Houghton, Lord
  140. Howard, J. B.
  141. Howe, H.
  142. Hudson, H.
  143. Hughes, Thos., M.P.
  144. Hurst, J.
  145. Hutchinson, Mj-Gn
  146. Huysbe, Wentworth
  147. Jackson, R.
  148. Jeffs, R.
  149. Jennings, L. T.
  150. Jennings. H. J.
  151. Jerrold, Blanchard
  152. Johnson, W. S.
  153. Johnson, S.
  154. Johnson, Edmund
  155. Kelly, Charles
  156. Kemble, H.
  157. Kendal, W. H.
  158. Kenney, C. Lamb
  159. Keppell, Adl. Sir Hy.
  160. Kingston, W. Beatty
  161. Kinsman, C.
  162. Knapp, E. L.
  163. Knight, Joseph
  164. Knowles, James
  165. Labouchere, Henry
  166. Lacy, Walter
  167. Latham, J.
  168. Lawley, Hon. F.
  169. Lawson, F. W.
  170. Lawson, W. R.
  171. H. B. Ledger
  172. Lee, Henry
  173. Lee, Richard
  174. Leggatt, W. A.
  175. Legge, E.
  176. Leigh, H. S.
  177. Leighton, Sir B.
  178. Levy, Jonas
  179. Lewis, George
  180. Lewis, Arthur
  181. Lindsay, Sir C., Bart.
  182. Logie, Cosmo
  183. Londesborough, Ld.
  184. Long. E., A.R.A.
  185. Longden, Morell
  186. Lord, R. Halkett
  187. Louther, R.
  188. Loveday, H. J.
  189. Loveday. G. B.
  190. Lowrie, E. Y.
  191. Mackenzie, Dr. Morell
  192. Mackenzie, F.
  193. Maclean, J.
  194. Marshall, Frank
  195. Mathews, C.
  196. Mathison, Arthur
  197. M'Carthy, Jstn, M.P.
  198. M'Carthy, J. H.
  199. M'Dermott, E.
  200. Mead, T.
  201. Meller [sic no comma] T.
  202. M'Henry, J.
  203. Middlemist, P.
  204. Miles, Frank
  205. Millward, Charles
  206. Mitchell, A.
  207. Monckton, J. B.
  208. Moore, Frankfort
  209. Mortimer, J.
  210. M'Turk, W.
  211. Murray, Douglas
  212. Nedley, Dr.
  213. Neville, Henry
  214. Nicholson, H.
  215. Northcott. T.
  216. Nottage, Alderman
  217. O'Connor, John
  218. Odell, E. J.
  219. Oliver, H.
  220. Onslow, Earl of
  221. Onslow, Captain
  222. Orchardson, W., R.A.
  223. Parkinson, J. C.
  224. Paterson, A.
  225. Paul, H.
  226. Payne, H.
  227. Peele, Dr.
  228. Pellew, E.
  229. Pettie, J., R.A.
  230. Pinches, E.
  231. Pinero, A.
  232. Pollock, Sir F., Bart.
  233. Pollock, Walter
  234. Pollock, F.
  235. Powles, L. D.
  236. Prinsep, Val, A.R.A.
  237. Pritchard, Baden
  238. Purnell, T.
  239. Rae, C. M.
  240. Randegger, A.
  241. Reece, R.
  242. Richards, Brinley
  243. Rignold, G.
  244. Roche, A.
  245. Rodgers, J.
  246. Russell, E.
  247. Russell, H.
  248. Ryan, Desmond
  249. Ryder, J.
  250. Saker, E.
  251. Sambourne Linley
  252. Samuda, J. D'A.
  253. Sawyer, W.
  254. Schlesinger, Dr. Max
  255. Scott, Clement
  256. Selwyn, E. M.
  257. Seton, Sir Bruce, Bt.
  258. Simpson, Palgrave
  259. Sinclair, C. G.
  260. Smalley, G. W.
  261. Smiles, Sam, LL.D.
  262. Smily, C. A.
  263. Smith, Talbot
  264. Soutar, R.
  265. Spottiswoode, W.
  266. Stack, Herbert
  267. Stirling, A.
  268. Stoker, Bram
  269. Stuart-Wortley, A.
  270. Swanborough, E.
  271. Swanborough, A.
  272. Swinbourne, T.
  273. Tadema, L. Alma R.A.
  274. Tapping, A.
  275. Tarry, Isaac
  276. Taylor, Tom
  277. Teesdale, J. M.
  278. Telbin, W.
  279. Tenniel, John
  280. Tennyson, Lionel
  281. Thompson, W.
  282. Thompson, Alfred
  283. Thompson, Sir H.
  284. Thomson, Dr. W.
  285. Thorley, J.
  286. Thorne, T.
  287. Timmins, S.
  288. Tingay, C.
  289. Tinsley, W.
  290. Toole, J. L.
  291. Toole, F.
  292. Turner, Godfrey
  293. Turner, Fox
  294. Tyars, F.
  295. Vaughan, H.
  296. Vernon, W. H.
  297. Vezin, Hermann
  298. Walker, S.
  299. Warner, Charles
  300. Watson, A. E. T.
  301. Webber, Byron
  302. White, H.
  303. Wigan, Horace
  304. Wilde, O.
  305. Wilde, W.
  306. Williams, Montagu
  307. Williams, Hume
  308. Wills, W. G.
  309. Wingfield, Hon. L.
  310. Winslow, Dr. Forbes
  311. Wyndham, R.
  312. Yardley, E
  313. Yates, Edmund
  314. Young, Sir C., Bart.
  315. Young, T. H.

The Chairman briefly proposed, "The Queen, the Prince of Wales, and all the Royal Family," which was duly honored,the National Anthem being sung by an invisible choir and, soloist, accompanied by the stage harmonium.

Lord HOUGHTON said this was a convivial and private meeting, but he was commanded to give them a toast -- "The Health of Mr H. Irving and the Lyceum Theatre." The occasion on which they met was a centenary of the performance of The Merchant of Venice. He did not like centenaries, but Our Boys had had a great many centenaries, and therefore our men should have more. The Bells of Corneville had been ringing on he did not know how many nights, and the Bells of Alsace nearly as many. For his part, looking back to the days of his youth, he preferred the arrangement by which the same pieces came on never more than twice a week, when one could see various actors in various roles [sic] with various and additional interest, and he was not sure that the present system did not entail upon the performers great personal exertions almost to the injury of their health, and he was quite sure it could not be any great benefit to art. But things must be accepted as they were, and it was under that state of things that Mr Irving had accepted the management of that Theatre, and he had done so under very favourable auspices, for dramatic art was popular with all classes. He had come also at a time when the Stage was purified very much from the impurity and it might be the scandal attaching to it before, so that the tradition of good breeding and high conduct was not confined to special families like the Kembles, or to special individuals like Young or Mr Irving himself, but had spread over the larger part of the whole profession, so that families of condition were ready to allow their sons, after a University education, to enter the dramatic profession. There had been a school of historians who had taken upon themselves to rehabilitate all the great villains of the world. The Roman historians made Nero and Tiberius only a little diverted from their benevolent intention, either by wishes to promote order amongst their people, or by ordinary love of art. Royal historians made Richard III. a most amiable sovereign, particularly fond of nephews, while French historians showed that Marat and Robespierre were only prevented from regenerating the human race by their dislike to shedding human blood, while upon that stage they had seen a rehabilitation, something of the same nature, for the old Jew Shylock, who was regarded usually as a ferocious monster, whose sole desire was to avenge himself in the most brutal manner on the Christians of his neighbourhood, had become a gentleman of the Hebrew persuasion, in voice very like a Rothschild, and not more ferocious than became an ordinary merchant of the period, afflicted with a stupid, foolish servant and a wilful, pernicious daughter; and the process went on till the Hebrew gentleman, led by a strange chance into the fault of wishing to vindicate in his own person the injuries of centuries of wrong to his ancestors on the person of the merchant of Venice, is foiled by a very charming woman, but he nevertheless retired as the avenger of the wrongs of centuries heaped upon his race accompanied by the tears of women and the admiration of men. He could quite imagine, if Mr Irving chose to personate Iago, he would be regarded, not as a violent, but as a very honest man, only devoted to the object of preserving the honour of his wife, or if he chose to resume the character of Alfred Jingle, he would, instead of a disreputable character, go down to posterity nothing more than an amiable young man, who wished to marry the maiden aunt and give her some of the joys of married life. But there was one character which Mr Irving would never pervert or misrepresent, and that was his own. He would always show, in the management of his Theatre, the dramatic spirit which his country demanded. He would always be the true artist, loving art for its own sake, following in the personalities which he represented no mere dramatic form, not merely tradition, but carrying out as best he could the high forms of his own great imagination. They would see him in his relations with others, as in the management of the and that was, a very large relation; they would see him considerate to all about him, kind to and cognisant of the merits of others -- a very difficult thing in all forms of art, and especially in the one Mr Irving occupied. He believed that, under these circumstances, Mr Irving would achieve a great name, and that when the children's children of those at that gathering were reading the dramatic annals of the present time, and found how highly the name of Mr Irving had been mentioned under all conditions of dramatic life, they would be proud to find from their family traditions that their progenitors had been there that night. The noble lord concluded by proposing "The Health of Mr Irving," which was drunk with enthusiasm, the guests rising to do honour to the toast.

Mr IRVING'S reply was marked by that happy combination of the light and playful with the earnestness so apparent in all his speeches, whether at friendly gatherings or in front of the Lyceum drop curtain, when invited to address a crowded audience on memorable occasions. He said he had intended not to have any speeches, but Lord Houghton had told him his health would certainly be proposed, whereupon he had thought of a most elaborate reply. Lord Houghton, however, had not said exactly what Mr Irving thought he would say; so that his (the speaker's) intended reply had been "knocked into a cocked hat." After acknowledging the manner in which his health had been proposed and drunk, he laughingly said he had received a five-act play in blank verse called The After Life of Shylock, for which he had serious thoughts of asking their consideration for one night, the last scene of which was the return of Shylock with a basket of lemons on his back. He thought something might be made of it, and it was certain that the sympathy of the tribe would go a great way towards insuring success, for they now came from all parts to see Shylock, the only people who did not like it being the Germans. He paid a tribute to the zeal displayed by the Lyceum company in this revival, and observed that if Shylock had been represented as a "Whitechapel old gentleman" he did not think they would have been there to commemorate the 100th performance of The Merchant of Venice. He believed that Shakespeare would have been pleased to be present at such a gathering, and after once more expressing his obligations to his assistants in the representation, he by uttering the motto affixed to the book presented to his guests: --

I count myself in nothing else so happy
As in a soul remembering my good friends.

When Mr Henry Irving had thus divertingly responded to the speech of Lord Houghton, the attendants passed round to the guests boxes of cigars of the finest brand, and presented each visitor, as a souvenir of that memorable occasion, with an exquisitely-printed copy of the acting edition of the play revived with such unparalleled success. Then the company prolonged their stay, the hours flying rapidly by as the merry hum of social converse deadened the sound of Time's fluttering wings; and when the last of the Three Hundred shook hands with their generous host, who had entertained them in such a princely fashion, the grey light of a misty February morning was dawning on the Lyceum portico, and the most enjoyable of evenings had passed into a pleasant and enduring memory.</quote> ("Merchant of Venice. The Hundredth Night.")

The London Standard 16 February 1880:Edit

<quote>Mr. Henry Irving entertained at supper, on Saturday evening, some three hundred friends, including noblemen and gentlemen eminent in art, science, and literature, on the occasion of the hundredth performance of the Merchant of Venice. He received his guests in the apartment attached to the Lyceum, which will ever be classic from its connection with the old Beefsteak Club. Some of the properties of that body still remain to decorate the scene of its former triumphs. From the old club-room the guests were ushered to the stage, many who were honoured with the gifted lady's acquaintance receiving a kindly greeting from Miss Terry as they passed into a splendid marquee in alternate white and scarlet stripes, with two magnificent chandeliers, which, after the close of the performance, had been erected as if by magic on the stage. Here tables set out in the most admirable taste with plate and flowers had been prepared for the large gathering, every seat being filled. Mr. IRVING occupied the chair, supported by Lords Houghton and Londesborough on his light and left. One motto decorated the Pavilion, "At first and last a hearty welcome." As a memento of a remarkable and most agreeable evening, a copy of the Merchant of Venice, bound in white and gold, was distributed to each guest.

After the banquet the CHAIRMAN briefly proposed "The Queen, the Prince of Wales, and all the Royal Family," which was duly honoured, the National Anthem being sung by an invisible choir and soloist, accompanied by the stage harmonium.

Lord Houghton, to whom was entrusted the pleasant duty of proposing the only other toast which was drunk, namely, "The Health of Mr. Henry Irving and the Lyceum Theatre," referred to the reason which had brought this large assembly together. After alluding pleasantly to the modern dramatic tendency towards "long runs," and declaring his own decided preference to the system obtaining in the days of his youth, when the same piece was never played more than twice a week, and when the public had the opportunity of seeing actors in different rôles, he eulogised Mr. Irving's conduct of his theatre under the modern conditions, comparing that gentleman's reading of Shylock to the modern historical view of rehabilitating all the great villains of the world. Though Shylock was generally viewed as a ferocious monster whose desire was to avenge himself and the wrongs of his race on the Christian merchant, he became in Mr. Irving's hands a gentleman of the Hebrew persuasion who retired, after being foiled by a very charming woman, accompanied by the tears of women and the admiration of men. Concluding by a high testimony to Mr. Irving's love of art for its own sake, and his faithfulness to his own art conceptions, he submitted the toast to the assembly, by whom it was honoured in a manner most flattering to Mr. Irving and the members of his company.

Mr. IRVING, who on rising to reply was received with great applause, said it was his intention not to have afflicted his guests with any speeches. He had been, however, overruled by a dear and valued friend, who told him it was nonsense; that his health would have to be proposed, and who had undertaken to nominate the proposer. Lord Houghton had most kindly undertaken the task, so that he had not been taken by surprise at the toast being given. He had been thinking of what to say in response, but as Lord Houghton had not, as he had anticipated, described him as the most extraordinary person that had ever trod the face of the earth, who had done wonders for dramatic art, and other things— — not a bit of which he believed himself— — his speech in reply had been knocked into a cocked hat (laughter). He was very much indebted, however, to Lord Houghton for what he had said, for it had set him thinking very seriously. He had had a play sent to him, an admirable play in five acts and in blank verse.— — (Lord Houghton: It is not mine.)— — No, it was not by Lord Houghton, but it was by a friend of his (laughter), and he had serious thoughts of asking their consideration of it, at any rate for one night. He believed in the play, which was called the After Life of Shylock; the last scene was wonderfully effective, for Shylock came back to Belmont with a basket of lemons on his back (laughter). Being pathetically told in blank verse, he did not know but what that side of Shylock might not be made very interesting for all the tribe, and as it was a very large one their sympathy and countenance contributed a great deal towards the success of any play. They came now from all parts of Europe to see the Merchant of Venice, and the only people who did not like it were the Germans (laughter). Seriously, however, he did not know how to thank them for the kind way in which they had responded to the toast. They could not at that hour discuss Shylock, for they were not a Shakesperian debating society; they would, therefore, accept all that Lord Houghton had said, and he desired on his own behalf, and in the name of the Lyceum Company, to thank the noble Lord for the kind and friendly manner in which he had spoken of them. There was not one of the company who was not pleased at the meeting to celebrate the hundredth night of the Merchant of Venice. They all felt as modest and as grateful as he did himself that they should have been able to carry the play on so long, a result which he did not think could have been attained if Shylock had been the Whitechapel old gentleman he was generally represented; but which was not his conception of the character. Though people came to the thousandth representation of the Corsican Brothers, as the Merchant of Venice was proverbially an unpopular play, they could only be grateful for the gifts which the gods had provided. Looking round the tables he saw men of all stations and creeds from the four quarters of the earth, and certainly from the four corners of Great Britain and Ireland; and knowing that they were allied by the ties of art and friendship, he believed that Shakespeare, if he could be present, would rejoice to think that the seed he had sown broadcast three centuries ago had borne such good fruit; and another pleasant thing for him to know, too, was that the work he had done for the sake of art brought fortune in its wake (cheers).

The gathering then assumed a purely social character, and did not disperse for some time.</quote> (MIaTMoV)

Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper 15 February 1880Edit

<quote>At this theatre it has once more been proved that Shakspere [sic], worthily interpreted, spells success, and not "ruin." Amid the varied attractions of modern plays, the frivolity of pantomime, and the depressing influences of a severe and foggy winter, the Merchant of Venice has enjoyed a must triumphant career; and last night witnessed the hundred and first performance -- a continuous run never previously approached since the comedy was written. Other actors have made the Jew famous in theatrical history, but it was reserved for Mr. Irving to present so complete a rendering of the Shakesperian idea as to meet at once the demands of art, the intelligence of the time, and the approbation of the public. Marked as was the excellence of the first night's representation, it has since increased in fullness and breadth; and now stands forth as the finest revival of the play that the present generation has witnessed. Phelps, great in most things, was not seen at his best as Shylock; but Charles Kean included the Merchant among his famous productions at the Princess's. The Lyceum version, however, is more complete and perfect, the appointments being tasteful and luxurious, without overshadowing the dramatic action or the strong individuality of the characters. Mr. Irving grasps the vindictive character of the Jew with a master hand, but in depicting the fixed and merciless pursuit of his revenge never loses sight of the humanity that clings to him. Hence it is that Shylock now awakens a feeling of pity, and even sympathy, such as he has not hitherto obtained upon the stage. When Tubal recounts the extravagance of the runaway Jessica there is a wail of anguish in Mr. Irving's recital of the lines, "The curse never fell upon our nation till now; I never felt it till now;" that deeply moves the audience. In the trial scene also, notwithstanding the rejoicing over Portia's triumph, very different feelings are awakened when the baffled Hebrew quits the court, to those, for instance, which attend the downfall of a monster like Macbeth. Mr. Irving's intense emotional power has never been displayed with finer effect than in this character; and the marked success of both Hamlet and Shylock proves how true is the judgment of the public in respect to the best production of the modern stage. After her enforced rest, Miss Terry has returned to repeat with renewed vivacity her delightful embodiment of Portia, which in the trial scene especially has vastly improved since the first night. Mr. Barnes makes a right gallant Bassanio, although in one or two scenes he might improve by being a little less loud in his delivery; and the efficiency of Mr. Forrester's acting as Antonio, is marred by a certain monotony of tone. Among the lesser characters, Mr. Tyars, as the Prince of Morocco; Mr. F. Cooper, Gratiano; Mr. Beaumont, the Duke; and Mr. S. Johnson, Launcelot Gobbo; are specially good, while Jessica has a charming representative in Miss Alma Murray. The performance last night was marked by all its accustomed effectiveness, whilst the more striking scenes received as much attention as ever from the crowded audience. Obtaining a cordial greeting on entering, and heartily applauded in all the scenes in which he appeared, Mr. Irving was called before the curtain at the end of the first, second, and fourth acts, on the latter occasion being twice summoned, when he led on Miss Ellen Terry. One of the best of Portia's scenes -- that in which she imitates the swaggering gait of a youth, suffered in its most critical portion through a bouquet being hurled at her feet, but Miss Terry took no notice of the vulgar interruption until she was called for at the close of the act.

In commemoration of the hundredth performance of the Merchant of Venice, Mr. Irving gave a supper at the Lyceum. The hour fixed was half-past 11, but it was nearly an hour later before the 300 guests had assembled upon the stage, which was fitted up as an elegant marquee, lighted with wax candles and two massive chandeliers. Nearly all the theatrical managers in the metropolis were present with the leading members of the theatrical profession. Mr. Irving was supported by the following gentlemen: -- Sir C. Young, Sir Henry Thompson, Admiral Gordon, Sir F. Pollock, Earl of Onslow, Lord Londesborough, Sir H. Keppel, Lord Houghton, Earl Dunraven, Earl of Fife, Sir Coutts Lindsay, Sir Gordon Cumming, Philip Currie, Tom Taylor. Among the other guests we noticed the following: -- H. J. Byron, Blanchard Jerrold, J. L. Toole, F. B. Chatterton, T. Thorne, Sir J. Benedict, J. Fernandez, J. Mortimer, Odell, G. Rignold, Bancroft, Tinsley, E. Swanborough, Jonas Levy. Labouchere, L. Brough, Albery, Grossmith, and Hermann Vezin. The supper was elegantly served, and at 10 minutes to two Lord Houghton rose to to propose the health of Mr. Irving and success to the Lyceum theatre. The toast was cordially received, and in replying Mr. Irving said he did not intend that the company should be bored with speeches. He touched in a light and humorous way upon Lord Houghton's remarks, and thanked the company for their presence in the most kindly manner. The formal proceedings were then brought to an end, and the company mingled in pleasant converse for the remaining hours of the most interesting social gathering.</quote> (LNT)

The Era 22 February 1880Edit

<quote>MR HENRY IRVING, in his amusing response to the speech of Lord Houghton, jocularly alluded to the possibility of a play being written to illustrate the after life of the Jew of Venice, and speculated on the effect to be produced by making the discomfited Hebrew come to Belmont as an itinerant vendor of lemons, and there recognising Portia as the young advocate who had detected a serious flaw in the bond. Such a play, however, has been written and acted. A five-act tragedy, in blank verse, called Shylock, a sequel to The Merchant of Venice, was written for the Manchester Theatre Royal forty years ago. The author was Mr C. A. Somerset, who had obtained some repute by his drama entitled Shakespeare's Early Days, brought out at Covent-garden Theatre in 1829, and in which Charles Kemble represented the youthful Shakespeare.</quote> (TG)

The Pall Mall Gazette 16 February 1880Edit

<quote>Mr. Irving entertained on Saturday evening about three hundred gentlemen, most of them connected with art, science, and literature, on the occasion of the hundredth performance of "The Merchant of Venice" at the Lyceum Theatre. Lord Houghton, in proposing the health of Mr. Irving, expressed a belief that future generations would associate his reputation with the highest conditions of dramatic life.</quote> (SMN)

The Graphic 21 February 1880Edit

<quote>Nearly three hundred friends of Mr. Irving, including noblemen and gentlemen connected with art, literature, and science, assembled at the LYCEUM Theatre on Saturday evemng, in response to invitations to a supper in celebration of the hundredth consecutive performance of The Merchant of Venice. Lord Houghton made a pleasantly humorous speech on the occasion, to which Mr. Irving replied.</quote> ("Theatres.")

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