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IT Fundamentals/File Management

< IT Fundamentals
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File Management includes common operations performed on files or groups of files, include creating, opening, renaming, moving or copying, deleting and searching for files, as well as modifying file attributes, properties and file permissions.[1] This lesson covers file management.

Contents

Objectives and SkillsEdit

Objectives and skills for the file management portion of IT Fundamentals certification include:[2]

  • Explain the basic methods of navigating an operating system
    • Executing programs
    • Manipulating files
      • Open
      • Edit
      • Save
      • Move
      • Copy
      • Cut
      • Paste
      • Delete
      • Rename
    • Difference between shortcuts and files
    • Navigate a file structure
    • Navigate with hot keys
    • Search, sort and display files
    • Read-only vs. modifiable files
    • Folder and file size
    • Folder and file permissions
    • Create screen captures
    • Accessibility options

ReadingsEdit

MultimediaEdit

ActivitiesEdit

  1. Display and navigate the file system:
  2. Review DAM Learning Center: How to Create a Logical and Manageable Folder Structure and DAM Learning Center: 5 Tips for Setting Up an Organized Folder Structure. Create a folder structure and organize files:
    • Windows: Use Windows Explorer to create a folder structure under Documents. Organize files by moving them into appropriate folders. Use keyboard shortcuts to cut, copy, and paste files.
    • OS X: Use the Finder to create a folder structure under Documents. Organize files by moving them into appropriate folders. Use keyboard shortcuts to cut, copy, and paste files.
    • Linux: Use Files to create a folder structure under Documents. Organize files by moving them into appropriate folders. Use keyboard shortcuts to cut, copy, and paste files.
  3. Create a shortcut:
  4. Search for files and folders:
  5. Restore deleted files:
    • Windows: Review How To Geek: How to Recover a Deleted File. Use Notepad to create a text file and save it on the Desktop. Delete the file. Open the Recycle Bin and restore the file.
    • OS X: Review Apple: Delete Files and Folders. Use TextEdit to create a text file and save it on the Desktop. Move the file to the Trash. Open the Trash and restore the file.
    • Linux: Review LinuxG.net: Linux and Unix Trash. Use gedit to create a text file and save it on the Desktop. Move the file to the Trash. Open the Trash and restore the file.
  6. Review folder and file attributes and permissions:
  7. Create a screen capture / screenshot of your system:
  8. Configure accessibility options:

Lesson SummaryEdit

  • A file manager or file browser is a computer program that provides a user interface to manage files and folders.[3]
  • The most common operations performed on files or groups of files include creating, opening (e.g. viewing, playing, editing or printing), renaming, moving or copying, deleting and searching for files, as well as modifying file attributes, properties and file permissions.[4]
  • A navigational file manager typically has two panes, with the file system tree in the left pane and the contents of the current directory in the right pane.[5]
  • A file shortcut is a link in a user interface that allows the user to find a file or resource located in a different directory or folder from the place where the shortcut is located.[6]
  • Microsoft Windows file shortcuts use a .lnk file extension.[7]
  • A keyboard shortcut is a series of one or several keys that invoke a software or operating system operation when triggered by the user.[8]
  • Keyboard shortcuts are typically implemented using either function keys or the Control key on PC keyboards, and function keys or the Command key on Mac keyboards.[9]
  • Common keyboard shortcuts include Control or Command plus: B - Bold text, I - Italicize text, U - Underline text, O - Open, P - Print, A - Select All, S - Save, F - Find, Z - Undo, Y - Redo, X - Cut, C - Copy, and V - Paste.[10]
  • File attributes are metadata associated with computer files that define file system behavior, with each attribute having one of two states: set and cleared.[11]
  • Traditional (FAT) file attributes include Archive, Hidden, System, and Read-only. NTFS file additionally attributes include Compressed, Encrypted, and Indexed.[12]
  • File system permissions assign permissions or access rights to specific users and groups of users to control the ability of the users to view or make changes to the contents of the file system.[13]
  • The FAT file system does not include file system permissions, only file attributes. NTFS, HFS Plus, and ext4 support attributes and permissions.[14]
  • Common file system permissions include Read, Write, and Execute.[15]
  • A screen capture or screenshot is an image taken by the computer user to record the visible items displayed on a visual output device.[16]
  • Computer accessibility refers to the accessibility of a computer system to all people, regardless of disability or severity of impairment, and is implemented using assistive technology.[17]

Key TermsEdit

Accessibility
The utility that enables use of assistive technologies on OS X and Linux.[18]
ACL (Access Control List)
A list of permissions attached to a file system object.[19]
alias
The name given to file links in OS X.[20]
assistive technology
An umbrella term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices and software for people with disabilities and also includes the process used in selecting, locating, and using them.[21]
Ease of Access Center
The utility that enables use of assistive technologies on Microsoft Windows.[22]
File Explorer
A file manager application included with the Microsoft Windows operating system.[23]
Files
The official file manager for the GNOME desktop.[24]
Finder
The default file manager and graphical user interface shell used on all Macintosh operating systems.[25]
Recycle Bin
Temporary storage for deleted files in the Microsoft Windows operating system.[26]
shortcut
The name given to file links in the Windows operating system.[27]
symbolic link
The name given to file links in Unix and Linux operating systems.[28]
Trash
Temporary storage for deleted files in OS X and Linux.[29]

Review QuestionsEdit

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  1. A file manager or file browser is _____.
    A file manager or file browser is a computer program that provides a user interface to manage files and folders.
  2. The most common operations performed on files or groups of files include _____, as well as _____.
    The most common operations performed on files or groups of files include creating, opening (e.g. viewing, playing, editing or printing), renaming, moving or copying, deleting and searching for files, as well as modifying file attributes, properties and file permissions.
  3. A navigational file manager typically has two panes, with the _____ in the left pane and the _____ in the right pane.
    A navigational file manager typically has two panes, with the file system tree in the left pane and the contents of the current directory in the right pane.
  4. A file shortcut is _____.
    A file shortcut is a link in a user interface that allows the user to find a file or resource located in a different directory or folder from the place where the shortcut is located.
  5. Microsoft Windows file shortcuts use a _____ file extension.
    Microsoft Windows file shortcuts use a .lnk file extension.
  6. A keyboard shortcut is _____.
    A keyboard shortcut is a series of one or several keys that invoke a software or operating system operation when triggered by the user.
  7. Keyboard shortcuts are typically implemented using _____ on PC keyboards, and _____ on Mac keyboards.
    Keyboard shortcuts are typically implemented using either function keys or the Control key on PC keyboards, and function keys or the Command key on Mac keyboards.
  8. Common keyboard shortcuts include Control or Command plus: _____.
    Common keyboard shortcuts include Control or Command plus: B - Bold text, I - Italicize text, U - Underline text, O - Open, P - Print, A - Select All, S - Save, F - Find, Z - Undo, X - Cut, C - Copy, and V - Paste.
  9. File attributes are _____.
    File attributes are metadata associated with computer files that define file system behavior, with each attribute having one of two states: set and cleared.
  10. Traditional (FAT) file attributes include _____. NTFS file attributes additionally include _____.
    Traditional (FAT) file attributes include Archive, Hidden, System, and Read-only. NTFS file attributes additionally include Compressed, Encrypted, and Indexed.
  11. File system permissions assign permissions or access rights to _____.
    File system permissions assign permissions or access rights to specific users and groups of users to control the ability of the users to view or make changes to the contents of the file system.
  12. The FAT file system does not include _____, only _____. NTFS, HFS Plus, and ext4 support _____.
    The FAT file system does not include file system permissions, only file attributes. NTFS, HFS Plus, and ext4 support attributes and permissions.
  13. Common file system permissions include _____.
    Common file system permissions include Read, Write, and Execute.
  14. A screen capture or screenshot is _____.
    A screen capture or screenshot is an image taken by the computer user to record the visible items displayed on a visual output device.
  15. Computer accessibility refers to _____, and is implemented using _____.
    Computer accessibility refers to the accessibility of a computer system to all people, regardless of disability or severity of impairment, and is implemented using assistive technology.

AssessmentsEdit

See AlsoEdit

ReferencesEdit