Educational research in the class council

Educational research in the class council edit

The curriculum "Educational research in the class council" is a small curriculum with guidelines and proposals for a possible development of educational research in a class council. The curriculum assumes that the class council debates at least bi-weekly and organizes working groups and projects or allows working groups and projects to present their results, if results are available. A research project can be carried out independently and voluntarily by interested students or can be assigned as additional work by the class teacher or the class council.

The class council appears especially suitable because the pupils can make educational research their own business in their very own committee and can learn to choose their learning methods themselves and to modify them consciously. The term "educational research" may appear exaggerated, but the pupils can, of course, also invent known methods anew or try out and research variations. The border between method training and testing and researching new methods may intentionally remain blurred. The pupils should be able to derive a common interest and a group identity as "young researchers" from their joint research.

How research goals, learning objectives and competence expectancies are achieved or ascertained can be considered to be the business of the class council. The subject-oriented lessons in some subjects will already provide a foundation for some of the learning objectives and competence expectancies of this curriculum. The communication of the class council with subject teachers and the appointment of working groups should be discussed in the class council. The class council is only in a few cases suitable to train skills and competencies in the class council itself, for instance in relation to civic education.

Grade seven edit

Method training edit

Method training in grade seven should repeat learning strategies and learning methods that have been tought in the grades five and six (the "orientation grades" in Germany). The pupils can try out learning strategies and learning methods according to their abilities and test the effectiveness of strategies and methods.

Examples:

  • By what percentage more effective does listening to music make learning of vocabulary?
  • Does one learn better if one makes a break every 45 minutes for 15 minutes and plays a computer game?
  • How does the group size affect the duration and quality of homework?
  • At what time does the completion of the homework for the next day get how unlikely?

Working groups and projects edit

Working groups and projects can work on research and learning objectives or train expected skills and competencies.

Proposals for working groups and projects:

  • Survey in the class: What books do you read?
  • Survey in the Class: How, when and where do you make homework?
  • Survey in the class: How do you learn for school?
  • Survey in the class: Which subjects to you like?
  • Working groups for learning research in individual subjects.

Coeducation edit

Young girls appear to benefit from the chance to form gender-specific groups. Girls should therefore occasionally be allowed to form their own class council.

Research and learning goals edit

Pupils in grade seven should learn to see learning as their very own project and to understand the learning process and learning more closely. In the process both errors in learning and successful learning strategies can be researched and described. The research should have a minimum academic standard and show that the researchers have developed theories, verified them and have obtained a result through measurement. A discussion of research results in the class council can bring about understanding for the quality of research and for cooperation with others.

The research reports should follow a clear structure. The specification of the structure allows the pupils to produce a sensibly usable result.

Example:

  • What do we want to investigate?
  • What do we expect?
  • How and what have we measured?
  • What have we observed?
  • Is the result convincing?
  • What follows?

Competence expectancies edit

  • methodological expertise (German Wikipedia: method competence)
  • reading literacy (reading competence)
  • social skills
  • social literacy (the development of social skills, knowledge and positive human values that engender the desire and ability in human beings to act positively and responsibly)

Grade eight edit

Working groups and projects edit

Working groups and projects can work on research and learning objectives or train expected skills and competencies.

Proposals for working groups and projects:

  • What does one learn through which hobby?
  • Survey in the grade: What do you want to learn outside school?
  • Survey of the grade: How do you learn?
  • Survey of the grade: What are your personal learning and educational goals?
  • Working groups for learning research in individual subjects.
  • How can the tuition in individual subjects be improved?
  • Projects: games of mental skill, logic puzzles, chess

Coeducation edit

Young girls appear to benefit from the chance to form gender-specific groups. Girls should therefore occasionally be allowed to form their own class council.

Research and learning goals edit

Pupils in grade eight should learn to think their learning methods through and to improve them. This should include understanding for psychological effects of learning and training for metacognition. The students can also carry out projects to improve the quality of teaching.

The research reports should follow a clear structure. The specification of the structure allows the pupils to produce a sensibly usable result.

Example:

  • What do we want to investigate?
  • What do we expect?
  • How and what have we measured?
  • What have we observed?
  • Is the result convincing?
  • What follows?

Competence expectancies edit

  • methodological expertise (German Wikipedia: method competence)
  • German Wikipedia: learning competence (ability and preparedness to interpret and evaluate information about facts and correlations alone or with others and to develop models about them)
  • German Wikipedia: communicative competence (ability to communicate constructively, effectively and consciously)

Grade nine edit

Topics edit

  • Magazines, books and other publications
  • Motivation of the pupils
  • Interests of the pupils
  • Individual curricula and learning plans
  • Independent formation and verification of theories in the various subjects and in interdisciplinary topics. Implausible theories can also be tested scientifically.

Research and learning goals edit

The pupils of grade nine should learn to select publications independently and to evaluate sources of further information in order to gain knowledge or to verify theories. In addition pupils should learn to observe their own group of pupils in order to understand each other's learning motivation and interests and, where appropriate, to encourage each other and to prepare individual curricula and learning plans.

Competence expectancies edit

Grade ten edit

Topics edit

Research and learning goals edit

Students should explore and research psychology, pedagogy and parenting and use the knowledge gained to reconsider their own life planning. In addition students should learn to understand the requirements of work, school and public life in relation to their own education and training and develop theories about meaningful social behavior. As a result pupils should, for instance, offer tutoring and mentoring in their school. Planning for demand can be conducted in the class council or in smaller groups; mentors can be especially useful for mentees in younger grades.

Competence expectancies edit

Personal educational goals edit

Students should define personal educational goals and plan appropriate action to achieve their educational goals.