Open main menu

Differential logic

This page belongs to resource collections on Logic and Inquiry.

Differential logic is the component of logic whose object is the successful description of variation — for example, the aspects of change, difference, distribution, and diversity — in universes of discourse that are subject to logical description. In formal logic, differential logic treats the principles that govern the use of a differential logical calculus, that is, a formal system with the expressive capacity to describe change and diversity in logical universes of discourse.

A simple example of a differential logical calculus is furnished by a differential propositional calculus. This augments ordinary propositional calculus in the same way that the differential calculus of Leibniz and Newton augments the analytic geometry of Descartes.

SyllabusEdit

Document historyEdit

Portions of the above article were adapted from the following sources under the GNU Free Documentation License, under other applicable licenses, or by permission of the copyright holders.