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The image depicts the X-ray output of the turned on Large Hadron Collider at Cern. Credit: CERN.

Hadron astronomy is a lecture from the radiation astronomy department, potentially for the course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

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Contents

QuizEdit







  

1

True or False, Any clumpiness in the galactic halo is through a spatially continuous elevation in the density of dark matter, rather than the more realistic discrete distribution of clumps.

TRUE
FALSE

2

Complete the text:

Match up the item letter with each of the possibilities below:
Meteors - A
Cosmic rays - B
Neutrons - C
Protons - D
Electrons - E
Positrons - F
Gamma rays - G
Superluminals - H
X-ray jets

the index of refraction is often greater than 1 just below a resonance frequency

.
iron, nickel, cobalt, and traces of iridium

.
Sagittarius X-1

.
escape from a typical hard low-mass X-ray binary

.
collisions with argon atoms

.
X-rays are emitted as they slow down

.
Henry Moseley using X-ray spectra

.

3

True or False, By crossing symmetry an elastic scattering cross section with a nucleon implies annihilation of dark matter (DM) into hadrons inside the halo, resulting in an anti-proton flux that could be constrained by data from the PAMELA collaboration if one includes a large boost factor necessary to explain the PAMELA excess in the positron fraction.

TRUE
FALSE

4

Complete the text:

Match up the radiation letter with each of the detector possibilities below:
Meteors - A
Cosmic rays - B
Neutrons - C
Protons - D
Electrons - E
Positrons - F
Neutrinos - G
Muons - H
Gamma rays - I
X-rays - J
Ultraviolet rays - K
Optical rays - L
Visual rays - M
Violet rays - N
Blue rays - O
Cyan rays - P
Green rays - Q
Yellow rays - R
Orange rays - S
Red rays - T
Infrared rays - U
Submillimeter rays - V
Radio rays - W
Superluminal rays - X
multialkali (Na-K-Sb-Cs) photocathode materials

.
F547M

.
511 keV gamma-ray peak

.
F675W

.
broad-band filter centered at 404 nm

.
a cloud chamber

.
ring-imaging Cherenkov

.
coherers

.
effective area is larger by 104

.
F588N

.
pyroelectrics

.
a blemish about 8,000 km long

.
a metal-mesh achromatic half-wave plate

.
coated with lithium fluoride over aluminum

.
thallium bromide (TlBr) crystals

.
F606W

.
aluminum nitride

.
heavy water

.
18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm

.
wide-gap II-VI semiconductor ZnO doped with Co2+ (Zn1-xCoxO)

.
a recoiling nucleus

high-purity germanium

.
magnetic deflection to separate out incoming ions

.
2.2-kilogauss magnet used to sweep out electrons

.

5

True or False, A quantum number that depends upon the relative number of strange quarks and anti-strange quarks is called a quarkness.

TRUE
FALSE

6

When the Earth is viewed from space using X-ray astronomy what characteristic is readily observed?

the magnetic north pole
the Hudson Bay meteorite crater
the South Atlantic Anomaly
the Bermuda Triangle
solar positron events
electrons striking the ionosphere

7

Which of the following is not characteristic of a neutrino?

neutrinos are affected by the weak nuclear force
produced by a positron annihilating an electron
a decay product of a neutron
produced by the near surface fusion on the Sun
may have a mass
comes in mutable varieties

8

True or False, An antimatter equivalent of a negative hadron having the same charge but a positive mass is called a positron.

TRUE
FALSE

9

Complete the text:

Match up the item letter with each of the first astronomical source possibilities below:
Meteors - A
Cosmic rays - B
Neutrons - C
Protons - D
Electrons - E
Positrons - F
Gamma rays - G
Superluminals - H
cosmic rays

galactic nuclei

.
comets

.
electron-positron annihilation

.
weak force nuclear decay

.
AGNs

.
511 keV photon pair production

.
solar wind

.

10

True or False, An antimatter equivalent of a hadron having the same mass but a positive charge is called an electron.

TRUE
FALSE

11

Which of the following are characteristic of a β+ decay?

a mu neutrino
a positron emission
a decay product of a neutron
weak interaction
an electron neutrino
comes in mutable varieties

12

True or False, A hadron under suitable conditions could be separated into chargons and a spinons.

TRUE
FALSE

13

Which of the following are characteristic of hadronium?

an exotic atom
a nucleus of neutronium
a decay product of a neutron
a weak interaction
a strong interaction
a center of mass

14

True or False, If a positive chargon and a negative chargon interact, a gamma ray without a wavelength results.

TRUE
FALSE


HypothesesEdit

  1. Hadrons, especially those traveling at very close to light speed, are directly detectable.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit