Motivation and emotion/Book/2022/Post-traumatic stress disorder and emotion

Post traumatic stress disorder and emotion
What is the relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and emotion?

OverviewEdit

You are underway  !

This template provides tips for topic development. Gradually remove these suggestions as you develop the chapter. Also consult the author guidelines.

At the top of the chapter, the title and sub-title should match the exact wording and casing as shown in the book chapter table of contents. The sub-titles all end with a question mark.

This Overview section should be concise but consist of several paragraphs which serve to engage the reader, illustrate the problem, and outline how psychological science can help.

Focus questions:

  • What is the first focus question?
  • What is the second focus question?
  • What is the third focus question?

 

Suggestions for this section:

  • What is the problem? Why is it important?
  • How can specific motivation and/or emotion theories and research help?
  • Provide an example or case study.
  • Conclude with Focus questions to guide the chapter.

Post-traumatic stress disorderEdit

How you are going to structure the chapter? Aim for three to six main headings between the Overview and Conclusion.

  Suggestions for this section:

  • For the topic development, provide at least 3 bullet-points about key content per section. Include key citations.
  • For the book chapter, expand the bullet points into paragraphs.
  • If a section has a lot of content, arrange it into two to five sub-headings such as in the interactive learning features section. Avoid having sections with only one sub-heading.

Underlying mechanisms of PTSDEdit

Emotions related to PTSDEdit

What brings an online book chapter to life, compared to an essay, are its interactive learning features. Case studies, feature boxes, figures, links, tables, and quiz questions can be used throughout the chapter.

Case studiesEdit

Case studies describe real-world examples of concepts in action. Case studies can be real or fictional. A case could be used multiple times during a chapter to illustrate different theories or stages. It is often helpful to present case studies using feature boxes.

Feature boxesEdit

Feature boxes can be used to highlight content, but don't overuse them. There are many different ways of creating feature boxes (e.g., see Pretty boxes). Possible uses include:

  • Focus questions
  • Case studies or examples
  • Quiz questions
  • Take-home messages
Feature box example
  • Shaded background
  • Coloured border

FiguresEdit

 
Figure 1. Example image with descriptive caption.

Use figures to illustrate concepts, add interest, and provide examples. Figures can be used to show photographs, drawings, diagrams, graphs, etcetera. Figures can be embedded throughout the chapter, starting with the Overview section. Figures should be captioned (using a number and a description) in order to explain their relevance to the text. Possible images can be found at Wikimedia Commons. Images can also be uploaded if they are licensed for re-use or if you created the image. Each figure should be referred to at least once in the main text (e.g., see Figure 1).

LinksEdit

Where key words are first used, make them into interwiki links such as Wikipedia links to articles about famous people (e.g., Sigmund Freud and key concepts (e.g., dreams) and links to book chapters about related topics (e.g., would you like to learn about how to overcome writer's block?).

TablesEdit

Tables can be an effective way to organise and summarise information. Tables should be captioned (using APA style) to explain their relevance to the text. Plus each table should be referred to at least once in the main text (e.g., see Table 1 and Table 2).

Here are some example 3 x 3 tables which could be adapted:

Table 1.

Example of a Table with an APA Style Caption

Children Gather Round
Mary had a
little lamb it's
fleece was white

Table 2.

Another Example of a Table with an APA Style Caption

Nursery Rhyme Time
Incy Wincy spider
climbed up the
water spout down

Table 3.

Example of a Sortable Table with an APA Style Caption

Fruit Price/kg Popularity
Tomatoes $6.00 1st
Bananas $5.00 2nd
Watermelon $2.99 3rd
Oranges $3.85 4th
Apples $4.95 5th
Grapes $9.50 6th
Mangoes $12.00 7th
Avocados $12.00 8th

QuizzesEdit

Quizzes are a direct way to engage readers. But don't make quizzes too hard or long. It is better to have one or two review questions per major section than a long quiz at the end. Try to quiz conceptual understanding, rather than trivia.

Here are some simple quiz questions which could be adapted. Choose the correct answers and click "Submit":

1 Quizzes are an interactive learning feature:

True
False

2 Long quizzes are a good idea:

True
False


To learn about different types of quiz questions, see Quiz.

Working notesEdit

It could be useful to have a temporary section for working notes during the topic development and chapter drafting. This section will be ignored when the topic development is marked, but remove it before finalising the book chapter.

ConclusionEdit

The Conclusion is arguably the most important section. It should be possible for someone to read only the Overview and the Conclusion and still get a good idea of the topic.

  Suggestions for this section:

  • What is the answer to the question in the sub-title (based on psychological theory and research)?
  • What are the answers to the focus questions?
  • What are the practical, take-home messages?

See alsoEdit

  Suggestions for this section:

  • Present in alphabetical order.
  • Include the source in parentheses.

ReferencesEdit

In this section, list the cited references in APA style (7th ed.). For example:

Blair, R. J. R. (2004). The roles of orbital frontal cortex in the modulation of antisocial behavior. Brain and Cognition, 55(1), 198–208. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0278-2626(03)00276-8

Buckholtz, J. W., & Meyer-Lindenberg, A. (2008). MAOA and the neurogenetic architecture of human aggression. Trends in Neurosciences, 31(3), 120–129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2007.12.006

Eckardt, M., File, S., Gessa, G., Grant, K., Guerri, C., Hoffman, P., & Tabakoff, B. (1998). Effects of moderate alcohol consumption on the central nervous system. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 22(5), 998–1040. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1998.tb03695.x

  Suggestions for this section:

  • Important aspects include:
    • Wrap the set of references in the hanging indent template. Using "Edit source": {{Hanging indent|1= the full list of references}}
    • Author surname, followed by a comma, then author initials separated by full stops and spaces
    • Year of publication in parentheses
    • Title of work in lower case except first letter and proper names, ending in a full-stop.
    • Journal title in italics, volume number in italics, issue number in parentheses, first and last page numbers separated by a en-dash(–), followed by a full-stop.
    • Provide the full doi as a URL and working hyperlink
  • Common mistakes include:
    • incorrect capitalisation
    • incorrect italicisation
    • providing a "retrieved from" date (not part of APA 7th ed. style).
    • citing sources that weren't actually read or consulted

External linksEdit

In this section, provide up to half-a-dozen external links to relevant external resources such as presentations, news articles, and professional sites. For example:

  Suggestions for this section:

  • Only select links to major external resources about the topic
  • Present in alphabetical order
  • Include the source in parentheses after the link